Needle Free Breathalyzer for BG readings

BG Breahalyzer, maybePeople with

diabetes have to prick their fingers multiple times a day to monitor their blood sugar levels, but researchers report that someday patients may be able to do that simply by checking their breath.

A hand-held device would measure levels of the chemical acetone in someone’s breath. Acetone levels rise when blood sugar levels rise, and acetone is responsible for the sweet, fruity smell on the breath of people with diabetes who have high blood sugar levels.

What hasn’t yet been proven is whether or not blood sugar levels reliably rise and fall with acetone levels, according to the study’s lead researcher, Ronny Priefer, a professor of medicinal chemistry at Western New England University in Springfield, Mass.

"If we can successfully show that there is a linear correlation between acetone levels and blood glucose [sugar] levels, the ease of which an individual with diabetes can monitor their disease state should be dramatically simplified," Priefer said.

Read the entire article here

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What do you think? 

Dexcom Sensor Not Staying "Stuck" … one suggestion

The other night at a local diabetes meeting someone asked how they could get the G4 sensor to stay stuck longer.

I have tried Skin-Tac and it was OK but not as easy to work with as I liked. Basically it is an alcohol swab with rosin added. Very sticky on your fingers too after you put it on.

The next time I decided to try and go for a third and/or fourth week. An the Skin-Tac sort of started letting me down. Later my wife was at Wal-Mart and saw Nexcare tape over the counter, for a little over $3, much less expensive than the other which I got with a prescription.

I usually keep my sensor on for 4 weeks and the tape and the sensor are working great, this is my “go to” now.

Removal is easy and seems that the tape strips, which I cut to fit as a , last about 4-7 days depending on location, showers, working outside, etc. When it starts to let loose I remove the existing tape and apply a new "frame." I hope this can help someone.

New “closed loop system” research project

I am starting in a new study and they need more Type 1’s, especially males, but not limited to us only.  You also need to be a pumper.  Read the first little bit of info below.

If you are interested just let me know and I can put you in touch with the right people.  This is being done at UVA, Charlottesville, VA so I would guess you need to be able to get there easily.

Thanks,

Ron

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Why is this research being done?

Scientists are working to develop a closed loop system to control blood sugar in people with diabetes mellitus.  The term closed-loop system refers to insulin dosage adjustments that are made automatically by a computer
based on blood sugar level readings. The closed loop system is made up of three devices, a continuous glucose monitor, a computer that uses a mathematical formula to calculate the dose of insulin, and an insulin pump.

This is a scientific research study that will look at how a “closed-loop” system and the drug Pramlintide may work together to improve blood sugar control in people with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Pramlintide is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is given as an injection (subcutaneous) that works with insulin to lower blood sugar.

In this study we will use FDA approved continuous glucose monitors (CGM’s) DexCom Seven Plus™ and insulin pumps (OmniPod Insulin Management System or OneTouch® Ping™ ). The computer software that manages the mathematical formula to determine the insulin dosage is considered experimental. We will ask…

Canines Improve the Lives of Diabetics

Talented dogs trained to recognize low blood sugar can help diabetics live a more fulfilling and healthy life.

By Elijah Wolfson

 

"If I’m asleep and my blood sugar drops, she’ll wake me up."

Kathy Allbright felt her life slowing down.

After years of long hikes by herself and exercising vigorously without any Odetta, the diabetes service dog.assistance, her type 1 diabetes was finally starting to limit her activities. It reached a point, Kathy says, that “it felt a little paralyzing.”

Kathy has a condition common among type 1 diabetics: hypoglycemic unawareness. That’s when a person can’t feel a rapid drop in blood sugar until it’s too late—until he or she is overcome by dizziness, stomach pains, confusion, or even a blackout or seizure.

Read more: http://www.healthline.com/health-feature/diabetes-service-dog#ixzz12uZxIgjv
Healthline.com – Connect to Better Health

Well, it’s official now

As of Wednesday I am finished with Phase 1 of the Artificial Pancreas research program at UVA.  However, I have volunteered/been asked to join Phase 2, which requires a lot of suffering on my part.  Only because I hate IVs and will have to live on one for two, separate 24 hour studies.  Especially when I found they go in my hands…almost fearful.  But I will face it for the “D” Team! 

imageThey will use the IV to draw my blood every 30 minutes to 1 hour for the 24 hours. 

They will also artificially run my BG up and down to find out how to build algorithms to auto-adjust insulin delivery in varying situations.  With the final outcome being an Artificial Pancreas; hopefully, in the next five years.

As I get ready for Phase 2 I will update you here, maybe from UVA (assuming they have free Wi-Fi in the rooms).

ALSO, important to me I am now a full time user of the Omnipod insulin pump system.  I was amazed at the ability, great personality and efficiency shown to me by the Insulet rep, Kobie.  YAY for Kobie (along with her great Australian accent) she did a great job.  She has been recommended on other sites too:

Also, do you have a personal contact at Insulet? If I may make a recommendation, ask to speak with Kobie. That is, if you’re not designated someone based on geographic location. She was my contact and she was with me every single step of the way. She really cared about me and wanted to make sure I got on the "pod."

I have been on the Cozmore pump (no longer in business) and the imageAnimas Ping (in business but I never got comfy with it) and the Omnipod is the best fit for me by most all measures.  Keep in mind that a pump is a very personal decision and just because I prefer one over another doesn’t mean that you should make a decision based on that.

Another Closed Loop/Artificial Pancreas update

Well, I had not realized it but found out at the end of last week was my last full week on the Omnipod and Dexcom 7.  This Wednesday, 10/06/10 I have to turn the PDM and Dexcom back in to UVA and Phase 1 of the Closed Loop research will be at an end.

However, and this is a biggie to me, after our research Focus Group meeting I get the PDM back and can go on the Omnipod fulltime.  Of course, that is if the Warlords, Blue Cross/Blue Shield will allow it.  But more on that as I learn.

As I have stated all along, the Dexcom is just OK but nothing special at least in my life.  You may get great benefit from it and that is great, but the ability to trend doesn’t give me that much that I already deal with by knowing how I feel.  But with the Omnipod….

I love that thing and want to go to it full time ASAP.  After 4-5 years on the Cozmore pump (my first which I liked) and several months on the Animas Ping the Omnipod has it all over both of them.  Better than both just because there is no tubing to mess with.  The Cozmore had more features but no tubing is the best for me and my lifestyle.  The Ping really was just OK but nothing to recommend it, nothing bad just nothing that made it a standout.

The Omnipod gave me much better control; fewer highs, imageprobably a few more lows but many less rollercoaster rides.  And did I mention NO TUBING!

When I first started looking for a replacement to MDIs and my Cozmore pump I ignored the Omnipod as I thought it was big, bulky and the tubing didn’t bother me.  But I have changed all of that thinking now.

If you have any questions for me just shoot me an email from the site here –> http://scr.im/dblclx.

Next, Phase 2 of the Closed Loop system research, which I will also be a part of.  I will keep you posted once I find out exactly what Phase 2 entails.